Gems

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Learn more about the gems we use

One of the rarest and most cherished gemstones, alexandrite is a phenomenon. This gemstone has the enchanting ability to appear green in bright daylight and plum by night in warmer firelight and candlelight.

Lore & Romance

Named after the Russian Czar Alexander II, alexandrite was discovered in 1833 in the emerald mines of Russia’s Ural Mountain Range. The stone was originally discovered by miners who, in the light of day, mistook it for an emerald. However, in the light of the campfire, the stone shone a beautiful, rich shade of raspberry red! When morning came, and the miners saw that the stone was once again a brilliant green, they knew they had discovered something entirely different. Because alexandrite’s colors of green and red were also those of Imperial Russia’s military colors, it became the national gem of tsarist Russia.

Birthstone

Alexandrite is the birthstone for June.

Origins

Unfortunately, the spectacular Ural Mountain deposits didn’t last forever, as most of Russia’s alexandrite was mined during the 19th century. Today, most alexandrite comes from Sri Lanka, East Africa, and Brazil.

Care

Because of its long-lasting nature and extreme rarity, alexandrite is an exceptional choice for jewelry. It is relatively hard – 8.5 on the Mohs scale – which means it has excellent toughness and is not prone to chipping. Warm, soapy water is always safe for this stone. Ultrasonic and steam cleaners are usually safe. As with all fine jewelry, alexandrite should not be worn while sleeping, swimming in pools or hot tubs, or exposed to chemicals.

This gem can be a variety of colors from pale almost opaque yellow, to rich translucent gold, to a deep, cloudy orange-red. Amber is an organic gem made of fossilized tree resin that formed tens of millions of years ago, when sap from ancient trees hardened and fossilized. Scientists and collectors treasure amber that contains suspended animal or plant fragments. These fascinating bits of once-living things were trapped in the hardening resin, creating nature’s own time capsule.

Lore & Romance

An ancient Greek tale describes amber as the “nectar of the setting sun, ”pooling like gold in the evening seas.” Medieval clerics crafted fine amber into rosary beads. The gemstone was so treasured that by 1400 A.D., knights controlled the European amber trade, and possession of its raw form was banned.

Origins

Amber dates between 25 and 50 million years old, although the oldest amber dates back to the Upper Carboniferous Period (that’s approximately 320 million years old!). This gemstone can be found throughout the world, although Baltic amber from eastern Europe is particularly prized. Other sources include Canada, the Dominican Republic, Germany, Lebanon, Mexico, Myanmar, and Sicily.

Care

Amber is quite soft and brittle, and should be delicately cared for. To keep this gem in pristine condition, avoid wearing while applying soaps, detergents, shampoos, commercial cleaning agents, etc. These harsh compounds tend to dull the gemstone’s finish. To clean amber, use lukewarm water and a soft cloth to gently remove dust and dirt. It may also be polished with a high quality olive oil to restore it’s sheen. Never use an ultrasonic or steam cleaner.

Though colorless in a pure state, the mineral beryl forms an exciting variety of colored gemstones. Bright green emerald, sea blue aquamarine, and peach pink morganite are all examples of the beryl family. Lesser known varieties include golden beryl and yellow-green heliodor.

Lore & Romance

According to myth, beryl provides the wearer protection against foes in battle or litigation. Legend says that beryl makes the wearer unconquerable and amiable, and also quickens the intellect.

Birthstone

Aquamarine is the birthstone for March, while Emerald is the birthstone for May.

Astral stone: Sagittarius

Origins

Because beryl is present in nearly every corner of the earth, the variety of a beryl gemstone is determined by the minerals present in its region of origin. For example, South America and Asia are rich in chromium and tend to yield blue and green gemstones. The iron-rich deposits of Africa, on the other hand, produce yellow-gold gems. The rarest stone in this gem family is known as red beryl and is found exclusively in the Wah Wah Mountains of Utah.

Care

With a hardness of 7.5-8 on the Mohs scale, beryl jewelry is certainly durable. However, due to its natural crystalline growth pattern, we do not recommend it for everyday wear as an engagement ring because it is brittle and vulnerable to cleaving upon impact. For safe cleaning, wash beryl pieces in a solution of mild dish soap and warm water, using a soft brush to scrub behind the stone. Like all fine jewelry, this gemstone should be removed before sleeping.

Chalcedony is loved for its glowing, translucent tones and its wide range of colors and shapes.

Lore & Romance

Because of its beauty, durability, and abundance, this mineral was a treasured gemstone of the ancient world. It was one of the first raw materials utilized by ancient man, and the Romans carved it into seals and signet rings. During the Victorian era chalcedony was crafted into beautiful mourning jewelry, including cameos and intaglios.

Origins

Found in all 50 states, in a variety of colors and patterns, this family includes agate, bloodstone, jasper, onyx, and petrified wood, just to name a few.

Care

With a hardness of 7 and enviable toughness, even when carved into ornate designs, chalcedony is relatively easy to care for. For safe cleaning, wash with warm water and mild dish soap. Like all fine jewelry, this gemstone should be removed before sleeping.

Diamonds are prized for their purity and brilliance as much as for their hardness and durability.

Lore & Romance

Diamonds have been celebrated since ancient times. Historians believe that India was trading in diamonds as early as the 4th century B.C., and nearly every civilization has some kind of lore surrounding the stone. The ancient Greeks considered the gems to be the tears of weeping gods and felt they were ideal for warriors, bringing them invincibility and strengthening their muscles. The Romans believed that these precious stones were parts of stars’ outer rings, having fallen to earth from the heavens.

Birthstone

Diamond is the birthstone for April.

Origins

The diamond is the only gem made of one single element: carbon. Certain trace elements can influence the stone’s color and crystal shape. They form under extremely high temperatures and pressure conditions that exist only about 100 miles beneath the earth’s surface. Their crystal structure is isometric, meaning that the carbon atoms bond in the same way in all directions. The result is that diamonds are so hard that they can only be scratched by other diamonds.

Care

With a rating of 10 on the Mohs scale, diamonds are the hardest gemstone known to man. This, along with their exquisite beauty, makes them excellent choices for both engagement rings as well as everyday rings. They can be cleaned safely with warm water and soap, ultrasonics and steam cleaners.

Garnet is prized for its range of vibrant hues and its brilliance that spans the color spectrum.

Lore & Romance

Garnet has been thought to protect against misfortune when away from home, and has traveled with many explorers and travelers throughout history. Garnet was used as early as 3000 BC in ancient Egyptian art and adornment.

Birthstone

Garnet is the birthstone for January.

Astral stone: Aquarius

Origins

Garnet is found around the world, with special color variations specific to certain locales. Spessartite and hessonite in beautiful orange, golden and brown hues are found in Namibia and Sri Lanka. The highly sought after brilliant green demantoid variety is mined in Russia. The deeper green hued tsavorite hails from Kenya, Madagascar and Tanzania.

Care

With a Mohs hardness of 7-7.5, garnet is a durable gem that offers long-lasting brilliance for everyday wear. They can be cleaned safely with warm water and soap, ultrasonics and steam cleaners. Like all fine jewelry, this gemstone should be removed before sleeping.

Jadeite is revered its soothing smooth texture and lush green hues. Fine jade appears to glow from within, amplifying the mysterious allure of this sensational gem. Jade today refers to two different gems: jadeite jade and nephrite jade.

Lore & Romance

According to myth, jade should be worn everyday as a healing gem and a bridge to the spiritual realm. Revered since ancient China, jade has been called the gem of royalty. In ancient Central American cultures, jade was employed in important economic and religious roles.

Origins

Jadeite jade is primarily found in Myanmar, while nephrite jade is mainly mined in Australia, Canada, and parts of Europe. Jadeite jade grows in white, lavender, pink and yellow in addition to the most prized and renowned vivid green hues. Nephrite is more abundant, typically less translucent, and grows in white, brown and black in addition to yellowish green.

Care

Both gems are tough and durable, and are perfect for long-lasting heirlooms. For safe cleaning, wash with warm water and mild dish soap. Like all fine jewelry, this gemstone should be removed before sleeping.

Like gazing into a starry night, the saturation and depth of color of lapis is inimitable.

Lore & Romance

Rich, vibrant indigo blue pigment dating to the Renaissance employed crushed lapis to achieve the vibrant blues highly desired in the fine arts.

Origins

Today lapis is primarily mined in the mountains of Afghanistan, with additional finds in the United States, Chile, and Siberia.

Care

Lapis has a Mohs hardness of only 5.5, and it a porous gem. It should be cared for delicately, and protected from exposure to chemicals. Clean with mild dish soap and soft brush to scrub behind the stone where dust can collect. As with all fine jewelry, lapis lazuli should be removed before sleeping.

This glowing, billowy gem scatters light for phenomenal displays of adularescence or shimmer.

Lore & Romance

This mystical gem plays a role in many ancient myths. The Hindu mythology tells of solidified moonbeams, and in Roman mythology moonstone was formed from frozen moonlight. Moonstone, according to legend, brings good luck to the wearer.

Birthstone

Moonstone is a birthstone for June.

Origins

Fine moonstone is often found in Sri Lanka and India. Other sources include Australia, Mexico, Madagascar, Brazil, and the United States.

Care

Moonstone has a hardness of 6 to 6.5. It should not be stored in contact with harder gemstones to prevent scratching. For gentle cleaning, use a soft brush to scrub behind the stone, where dust and debris can collect. Like all fine jewelry, this gemstone should be removed before sleeping.

The queen of gems, and the gem of queens.

Pearls are a very eco-friendly choice, because the water in which they grow must be clean and healthy in order to grow beautiful, healthy pearls. The conditions that form pearls are very delicate and involve a myriad of factors such as the temperature of water, pristine unpolluted waters, a natural parasitic intruder or surgically implanted mantle tissue, the density of mollusks, and the quality of the pearl’s environment among others. Our trusted pearl suppliers fight for clean water, and your purchase helps support sustainable farms and environmental advocacy around the world.

Lore & Romance

Signifying purity and virtue, love and wisdom, power and status: pearls were believed to emanate mystical, healing powers. Roman women slept with pearls to sweeten their dreams. Asian cultures ground them into powder for remedies and skin treatments.

Pearls also have a history as the wedding gem. Ancient Hindu writings tell the story of Krishna, the protector, who gathered pearls from the sea to give to his daughter on her wedding day—the start of a centuries-old tradition of pearls as the perfect adornment of the bride.

Birthstone

Pearl is a birthstone for June.

Origins

Natural pearls are produced in certain salt and freshwater mollusks when in response to a tiny intruder lodged within, the shell soothes the irritation by enveloping it in layers of calcium carbonate — mother-of-pearl or nacre.

In the wild, this happens rarely, one in about 10,000 shells. But most pearls today are cultured—science collaborating with nature to engage and nurture this natural process.

Care

Pearls are resilient and meant to be worn, but they are also delicate and require thoughtful care to keep their radiance for a lifetime. The layers of nacre that create it are absorbent, so things like cosmetics, hairspray, perfume, ammonia and chlorine affect pearl condition.

Let your pearl jewelry be the last thing you put on before heading out the door and the first thing you take off before engaging in activities where pearls are vulnerable to chemicals and hard knocks.

Pearls are easy to maintain; just wipe clean after each wear with a soft, dry or damp cloth. Ultrasonic cleaners are not recommended. Stow pearls in sectioned jewelry box or protective pouches to avoid getting scratched by other jewels. If you wear your pearl strands often, restring them every two years, and periodically check settings that embrace pearls to ensure they’re secure.

Peridot’s signature vibrant green sparkle is an eye-catching variety of the mineral olivine. Peridot is found in lava, deep in the earth’s mantle, and has even been recovered from meteorites.

Lore & Romance

The fabled origin of Peridot stretches back to ancient Egypt, on a volcanic island in the Red Sea. Peridot was so treasured by the ancient Egyptians that they kept the island’s location a secret.

Trace amounts of peridot have also been found in Hawaii. Tiny grains of peridot line the beaches, mixed with sand, and are too small to cut. In Hawaiian myth, they symbolize the tears of Pele, the goddess of fire.

Birthstone

Peridot is a birthstone for August.

Origins

Today, the largest sources of fine peridot are the United States, Myanmar, Pakistan, and the Himalayas.

Care

Peridot’s hardness of 6.5-7 on the Mohs scale and susceptibility to temperature mean that it requires special care. Soak pieces briefly in a solution of warm water and gentle dish detergent. Use a soft brush to clean around the setting and restore the gem’s luster.

This extraordinary gem embodies unique play-of-color, the ability to diffract light into flashes of rainbow color. Opals vary from translucent to opaque, from white to blue to black.

Lore & Romance

Opals spark the imagination: lightning, jellyfish, glitter, fireworks, galaxies and more can be seen when gazing into an opal. In Bedouin lore, opals contained lightning and fell from the sky during thunderstorms.

Birthstone

Opal is a birthstone for October.

Origins

Opals are mined in Australia, Mexico and the United States, with new sources found in recent years in Ethiopia.

Care

Opal should be treated with delicate care. A very soft gem, it should be stored separately to avoid being scratched by other jewels. Opal should not be exposed to chemicals, heat or acid. To clean, wipe opal jewelry with a soft cloth.

Durable, vibrant, and abundant in large sizes, quartz gem varieties are great for big, bold everyday jewelry.

Lore & Romance

Ancient Romans believed amethyst to be the tears of Bacchus, god of wine. In ancient Greece, amethyst was considered a stone of sobriety that could provide clarity. Citrine was cherished as a gift from the sun, and thought to protect the wearer from poisoning.

Birthstone

Amethyst is February’s birthstone, while citrine is November’s birthstone.

Astral stone: Pisces

Origins

Amethyst occurs around the world, with many deposits in the United States. Citrine is primarily mined in Brazil and Zambia.

Care

With a hardness of 7, quartz is not prone to easy cracking or chipping, and can be worn with peace-of-mind. Let the piece soak in a solution of warm water and a gentle dish detergent then use a soft brush to clean the stone and around the setting. Quartz should be cleaned often to avoid the buildup of cosmetics and dirt, which can affect the stone’s brilliance. Like all fine jewelry, quartz should be removed before sleeping.

Ruby is the most valuable variety of the corundum mineral species, which also includes sapphires. In their pure state, corundum are colorless. Trace elements that become part of the mineral’s crystal structure cause variations in its color – in the case of the ruby, its fiery red hue is caused by chromium.

Lore & Romance

For thousands of years, the ancient Hindus regarded the ruby as “The King of Gems.” The Bible celebrates rubies as the most precious of gemstones. Throughout human history, these radiant gemstones have been associated with symbols of passion, courage, love, and romance that endures.

Birthstone

Ruby is the birthstone for July.

Astral stone: Capricorn

Origins

India was classically regarded as this precious stones’ country of origin for more than two thousand years. In recent years Sri Lanka, Pakistan, and Afghanistan have all exposed substantial ruby deposits, as well as Myanmar, Cambodia, and Vietnam.

Care

With a Mohs hardness of 9, rubies do not demand delicate care. The safest cleaning method is using a solution of warm water and gentle dish detergent. Allow the piece to soak for a few minutes, lightly scrub with a soft brush, and let dry on a soft cloth. As with all fine jewelry, rubies should be removed before bedtime.

Sapphire’s extraordinary blue color is renowned. However, like the endless colors that appear in the sky, sapphires can be found in nearly every shade; from the gold of sunrise to the fleeting violet of twilight. These diverse colors are referred to as “fancy” color sapphires.

Lore & Romance

Traditionally these beautiful colored stones symbolize nobility, truth, sincerity, and faithfulness. In ancient Greece and Rome, kings and queens were convinced that blue sapphires protected their owners from harm and envy. Ancient Persian rulers believed that Earth rested on a giant sapphire and that it’s reflection colored the heavens blue. Even the jewels’ Latin name, “sapphiru”, means blue. The gift of a sapphire symbolizes a pledge of loyalty, sincerity, and trust.

Birthstone

Sapphire is the birthstone for September.

Astral stone: Taurus

Origins

The United States, particularly Montana, boasts sizeable deposits of fine sapphire. In Asia, well known sources of this spectacular gem include Myanmar, Cambodia, Thailand, Laos, Vietnam, Sri Lanka, and Kashmir. African deposits in Tanzania, Nigeria, and Madagascar also provide brilliant sapphires of every color. Additionally, Australia has been a steady source of of sapphires for years.

Care

With a Mohs hardness of 9, sapphires are relatively easy to care for. A gentle solution of warm water and dish detergent is safe for sapphires. Ultrasonics are generally safe, provided the gemstone has no fissures. As with all fine jewelry, sapphire should be removed before bed.

Spinel offers a range of hues, from vivid orange to intense red, vibrant pink, and all shades of purple, blue, and violet through bluish green. The higher the chromium content, the stronger the red hue. Orange and purple stones owe their color to a mixture of iron and chromium.

Lore & Romance

In ancient times, the mines of central and Southeast Asia yielded exceptionally large spinel crystals. These fine stones became known as Balas rubies, and some of them were the treasured property of kings emperors, often passing through many hands as spoils of war. As a result, some of the world’s most illustrious “rubies” are actually spinel. For example, the British Crown Jewels contain a piece called “The Black Prince’s Ruby”, which is actually a 170-carat red spinel.

Birthstone

Spinel is a birthstone for August.

Astral stone: Aquarius

Origins

The majority of spinel gems are mined from deposits in Myanmar and Sri Lanka, and lesser amounts from Tanzania and Tajikistan.

Care

With a hardness of 8, this durable gemstone is suited for any type of jewelry. To clean spinel at home, let the piece soak in a solution of warm water and a gentle dish detergent, scrubbing with a soft brush to remove dirt and dust. As with all fine jewelry, spinel should be removed before sleeping.

A member of the feldspar family, along with moonstone and labradorite, sunstone ranges in color from pale yellow to red-orange. Tiny platelets of metallic mineral inside the stone itself give this unique gemstone it’s trademark shimmer.

Lore & Romance

According to Native American legend, the blood of a great warrior – wounded by an arrow – dropped onto pieces of Oregon sunstone. The blood carried his warrior spirit into the stones, coloring them with shades of red and giving them sacred power.

Origins

Although deposits have been discovered in Mexico, China, Namibia, and Madagascar, the US is most known for producing this beautiful stone. The increasing supply from the area has made this mineral more available to the general public. Because many of the sunstone types are unique to the rugged high-desert area in South Central Oregon, they’re being marketed as an “all-American” gemstone.

Care

With a hardness of 6-7, sunstone should be worn with some caution to prevent scratching. To clean this gemstone at home, let it soak in a solution of warm water and mild dish detergent. Use a soft brush to clean the setting, and the stone’s luster will immediately return. Let dry on a soft cloth and store away from other jewelry to prevent scratching. As with all fine jewelry, sunstone should be removed before bedtime.

Tanzanite’s appearance is influenced greatly by its pleochroism, which is the ability of a gemstone to show different colors when viewed in different crystal directions. This gem can vary in color from vibrant blue – similar to a fine sapphire – to a violet hue all its own.

Lore & Romance

Although Tanzanite is a relative newcomer, it has quickly grown to become one of the most popular colored gems in the world. In 1967, a bolt of lightning triggered a wildfire that engulfed Tanzania’s Merelani Hills, laying them bare. Passing through after the flames subsided, local Masai herders noticed brilliant blue crystals on the ground. Although the herders were unaware, they had discovered the stone’s secret: when exposed to heat, its drab brown color transforms into a thing of beauty.

Birthstone

Tanzanite is a birthstone for December.

Origins

As its name suggests, Tanzania is the only place on earth where this brilliant gemstone can be found. Mined from the Merelani Hills at the base of Mount Kilimanjaro, the only known tanzanite deposits lie within a slender strip just five miles wide.

Care

Like pearl or opal, this gemstone requires special care. With a hardness of 6.5, tanzanite can be scratched if brought into contact with other gemstones. Take care to store this stone in its own protective pouch. At-home cleaning is recommended every second or third wear. Let the piece soak for a few minutes in a gentle detergent solution and use a soft brush to clean around the setting. Pat dry with a soft cloth or allow to air dry. Never put tanzanite in an ultrasonic machine or a steam cleaner.

Topaz has an exceptionally wide color range that, along with brown, includes various tones and saturations of blue, green, yellow, orange, red, pink, and purple. Colorless topaz is plentiful and is often treated to give it a blue color. This versatile gem is also pleochroic, meaning that it can show different colors in different crystal directions.

Lore & Romance

Scholars have traced the origin of the name “topaz” back to the Sanskrit word “topas” or “tapaz”, meaning “fire”. The ancient Greeks believed that topaz gave them strength, and bestowed invisibility in times of emergency. Ancient Egyptians believed that the stone was colored by the glow of the sun god, Ra. During the Renaissance, Europeans thought that topaz could break magic spells and dispel anger. For centuries, many people in India believed that topaz worn above the heart assured long life, beauty, and intelligence.

Birthstone

Topaz is a birthstone for November.

Astral stone: Sagittarius

Origins

Today, topaz deposits are found in Brazil, Mexico, Sri Lanka, Pakistan, Russia, Africa, and China.

Care

With a hardness of 8, topaz is ideal for everyday wear. To clean this gemstone at home, soak pieces in a solution of warm water and mild dish detergent. Use a soft brush to clean behind the mounting where dust can collect, and let dry on a soft towel.

While almost all gems are a variety of a single mineral, tourmaline is comprised of a group of minerals. These minerals’ chemical compositions and crystalline structures work in concert to produce tourmalines beautiful coloring. One of the most distinctive features of tourmalines is pleochroism, the presence differing colors or depths of color when the gem is rotated. Tourmaline is unique in that it is pyroelectric, becoming electrically charged when heated, and piezoelectric, electrically charged when squeezed. It grows in a miraculous variety of colors

Lore & Romance

Somewhere in Brazil in the 1500s, a Spanish conquistador washed the dirt from a green tourmaline crystal and confused the vibrant gem with emerald. His confusion lived on until scientists recognized the stone as a distinct mineral species in the 1800s. The confusion surrounding the stone’s identity is even reflected in its name, which comes from “toramalli”, which means “mixed gems” in Sinhalese (a language of Sri Lanka).

Birthstone

Tourmaline is a birthstone for October.

Origins

Tourmaline occurs throughout the world, with large deposits in the United States. California is known for pink tourmaline and Maine is known for sherbet-colored and mint green-colored tourmalines. Today, Brazil produces the largest volume and the widest color variety for a single location, including the highly sought after Paraiba variety – the most expensive of tourmalines, a copper-bearing, electric blue-green gem.

Care

With a Mohs hardness of 7 – 7.5, tourmaline is resistant to scratching, chipping, and cracking, making it an excellent choice for everyday wear. A gentle solution of warm water and gentle dish detergent will safely clean tourmaline jewelry. To clean strands of beads, wipe them with a wet cloth after each wear. As with all fine jewelry, tourmaline should be removed before sleep.

Turquoise is a vibrant blue stone that ranges from light, bright blue to deep blue-green. It may contain narrow veins of other materials, which are usually black, brown, or yellowish-brown in color. Known as the matrix, these veins sometimes form an intricate pattern called a spider web. Stones that display an unblemished, intense blue color are considered of highest quality.

Lore & Romance

Admired since at least 5500 BC, turquoise is esteemed in myths and legends stretching back to antiquity. According to lore, turquoise protects the spirit, enhances luck, promotes spiritual healing, and protects the wearer from malicious forces.

Birthstone

Turquoise is a birthstone for December.

Origins

Turquoise is found in numerous locales around the world, with very fine turquoise found especially in the American Southwest. Certain mines have become famous due to their particularly fine turquoise finds, such as Kingman or Sleeping Beauty.

Care

Turquoise is porous and can absorb almost anything it touches; we recommend applying  cosmetics, lotions and perfumes before putting on your turquoise. Avoid prolonged exposure to heat or very dry conditions, or your turquoise could dehydrate or discolor. As with all fine jewelry, turquoise should not be worn while sleeping, swimming in pools or hot tubs, or exposed to chemicals.

Natural zircon, known for its vivid colors and dazzling sparkle, is one the most ancient materials on Earth. A gemstone able to withstand incredible pressure, some pieces of Australian zircon date over 4.4 billion years old. Zircon sometimes contains traces of uranium, irradiating itself and changing its properties.

Lore & Romance

Zircon’s name comes from the Persian word “zargun”, meaning gold-hued. In the Middle Ages, zircon was believed to promote sleep, as well as bring prosperity, honor, and wisdom to its wearer.

Birthstone

Zircon is a birthstone for December.

Origins

Zircon is primarily mined in Cambodia, Sri Lanka, Vietnam, and Thailand, and occurs in nearly every color of the rainbow. True zircon should not be confused with cubic zirconia—a synthetic gem of much lesser value.

Care

Zircon jewelry should be stored with care; despite its hardness of 7.5 on the Mohs scale, its facets can chip and abrade easily. As with all fine jewelry, zircon should not be worn while sleeping. For safe cleaning, wash zircon jewelry in a solution of mild dish soap and warm water, using a soft brush to scrub behind the stone where dust can collect to restore brilliance.